2015 Year in Review

Early Childhood Program Year End Wrap Up          

As we come to a close in the calendar year, it is clear that 2015 marked enormous progress on the early learning initiative front!

Congress passed the FY2016 Consolidated Appropriations ActCartoon Capitol

The FY2016 Consolidated Appropriations Act (PL 114-113), enacted on December 18, included an increase of nearly $1 billion for programs operated through the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) — primarily for the Child Care and Development Block Grant and Head Start.

What’s in the Consolidated Appropriations Act for early childhood?

Matching Budget Information with Context:

For more information on the most recent data for CCDBG program statistics (number of children receiving assistance, settings those children are in) and for information about TANF funding used for child care by state, click here.

Early Head Start/Child Care Partnerships: The FY2016 Consolidated Young woman playing with boyAppropriations Act included $635 million for EHS/CCPs. This means that previous grants will continue to receive funding and $135 million in additional funding will be available for a new competition. Stay tuned for competition criteria and proposal deadlines in 2016. Current awards finalized in March of 2015 are here.

Preschool Expansion/Development Grants: The FY2016 Consolidated Appropriations Act included $250 million to continue another year of funding for current grantees.

Every Student Succeeds Act and Preschool Development Grants

On December 9, the President signed the Every Child Succeeds Act into Pre schoollaw (P.L. 114-95), which reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act- also known as the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law. The Every Child Succeeds Act includes many opportunities to better integrate early learning initiatives with K-12 education, including a new provision authorizing Preschool Development Grants. This new competitive grant program is designed to assist states to:

  • develop, update or implement a strategic plan to improve collaboration and coordination among existing early learning programs in a mixed delivery system across the state to prepare low income children to enter kindergarten ready to succeed;
  • encourage partnerships among Head Start providers, state and local governments, private entities (including faith and community based organizations), and local educational agencies, to improve coordination, program quality, and the delivery of services; and
  • to maximize parent choice among a mixed delivery system of early childhood education program providers.

The Secretary of HHS is in charge of the program to be operated jointly with the Secretary of the Department of Education. Watch for more details about the competition for funding in 2016.

Child Care and Development Block Grant Reauthorization Implementation:

November marked a year since the President signed the bipartisan CCDBG Act of 2014 into law. During that year, much progress has been made to promote more parent choice among high quality settings in every community.

CCDBG State Plan. In order for states to receive federal funds, each state must submit a state plan to HHS. The template for the state plan was published for public comment three times in 2015 (in January, in May, and in September). In December, the final state plan template was published.

Creative kids class

Many states have begun drafting their state plans, which are due on March 1, 2016. Some states have held public hearings already. HHS regularly posts updates on state plan public hearings under Key Resources Related to the Implementation of the CCDF Reauthorization Law.

CCDBG Regulations. On December 24, HHS published proposed CCDF regulations in the Federal Register. Public comments with regard to the proposed regulations are due on or before February 22, 2016. The regs play a key role in ensuring that states have a uniform interpretation of the law.

Head Start:

In June, HHS proposed the first major revision and reorganization of the preschool boy green shirtHead Start Performance Standards, which were open for public comment for several months. The proposed program performance standards will improve the quality of services, reduce bureaucratic burdens, and improve regulatory clarity and transparency. They provide a clear pathway for current and prospective grantees to provide high quality Head Start services and to strengthen outcomes for the children and families served. Read the proposed revisions and watch for final regulations in 2016.

Also Noteworthy for the Early Childhood Field: (Released in 2015)

Happy New Year! Wishing you all the best in 2016! We have come so far in 2015. 2016 will be the year to close the gap between research, policy, and practice… The opportunity is yours. Seize the day!

Unlicensed Child Care Puts Children At Risk

The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is allocated to states to both assist families in affording the cost of child care and to improve the quality of child care (such as through training or other activities). In October, new state reported child care data was released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) with regard to the number of low income children in each state assisted through  CCDBG.  boy playing w blocks, verticle stock

Overall in FY2013, about 1.4 million children received assistance each month (about 47,500 fewer children in 2013 compared to 2012). The number of children receiving assistance is one part of the story. An equally important part of the story is the type of child care paid for by CCDBG.

In many cases, low income families who receive assistance are able to access quality child care that they would not otherwise be able to afford.  That’s good news for children who will be in a safe setting that promotes their healthy development. And, great news because research shows that high quality child care makes a difference for all children, but particularly for the school readiness of low income children.

What is troubling is that of the 1.4 million children receiving federal subsidies, about 15 percent (218,265) are in unlicensed care. This means that these children are in settings where little is known about the provider except that she receives a government check to care for low income children. In many states, these unlicensed providers are not required to have training, there are no minimum health and safety protections for children (or maybe there is a checklist that providers submit “self-certifying” compliance) and no inspections are required – unless there is a parent complaint.

In 11 states plus Puerto Rico, 25 percent or more of the children receiving a subsidy are in unlicensed care (Hawaii, Oregon, Alabama, Puerto Rico, Nevada, Illinois, Connecticut, Michigan, New York, Missouri, North Dakota, and Indiana).

unlicensed by percentage snapshot fy2013

In 18 states, of the children in unlicensed settings whose care is paid for through CCDBG, more than half of the children are with non-relatives.

Unlicensed NonRelative Care Declining FY2013

Why does it matter? Child care licensing serves to provide some minimum health and safety protections for children in child care. States may require minimum training for providers and an emergency plan in the case of a fire or simple things like working smoke detectors and a fire extinguisher. In the past month in Virginia, 3 babies have died in unlicensed at home child care programs where providers had no training for emergencies, no fire extinguishers, and no working smoke detectors.  For Virginia, 46 infants have died over the last few years in unlicensed care. In Missouri, more than 67 babies have died in unlicensed care.  In Indiana, 18 babies have died in unlicensed care. Maybe some of these children were on a subsidy, but we don’t know because current law does not require reporting of this type of data.

The death of any child is a tragedy. It’s an even greater tragedy when the deaths can be prevented. Licensing  serves to protect the health and safety of children. One would think that when taxpayer dollars are used to pay for the care of low income children, that the settings paid for would be safe. But, with unlicensed care, we just don’t know. What we do know is that unlicensed care poses risks to children since there are no minimum health and safety protections.

This week, the Senate will consider legislation to reauthorize (renew) the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG). The bill was approved by the House of Representatives on September 15.  If approved by the Senate this week, the measure will be forwarded to the President to be signed into law. The bill includes important new health and safety protections for children. It requires more accountability for state expenditure of federal funds.  But, most importantly, it will help strengthen the quality of child care in every state so that parents have more choices among quality settings.

Arkansas, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Ohio, and Wisconsin, choose not to use subsidy dollars to pay for unlicensed care.  For the rest of the states, the bill will require a review of the policies to protect children when the states allow funding for unlicensed settings.  The bill requires:

  • a comprehensive background check (a fingerprint check against state and federal records, a check of the state child abuse registry and a check of the state sex offender registry) for all licensed or regulated care and unlicensed nonrelative care where subsidies are used;
  • States that choose to use subsidies to pay for unlicensed care to publicly explain why such care does not endanger the health, safety, or development of children;
  • At least one annual inspection of all providers receiving a subsidy, including unlicensed non-relative care;
  • Minimum training on important health and safety topics like safe sleeping practices and training related to the social, emotional, physical, and cognitive development of children; and
  • States to report deaths in child care, differentiated by type of setting and whether the setting is licensed or unlicensed.  Requiring the collection of this data is not to be morbid, but to better inform states and HHS about any trends and training that might make a difference.

The bill does not require assistance to families to be used for licensed care. However, it does require states to ensure that if they choose to use taxpayer dollars in unlicensed care, that children are safe. Children should be safe in child care – whether that care is paid for by a subsidy or not.

Working Families Near Victory on Safe, Quality Child Care

On September 12, a bicameral, bipartisan agreement was announced on legislation to reauthorize the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG), the federal law that allocates funds to the states to assist families with the cost of child care and to improve the quality of child care.  The last time that Congress reauthorized or made changes to CCDBG was in 1996 – 18 years ago. teacher and kids circle time

Much has happened since that time. Today, 74.7% of mothers with school-age children are working and 64% of mothers with children under age 6 are working. In fact, today, 57.3% of mothers with infants are working.  In today’s economy, mothers work to support their families.  Census Bureau data released on September 16 showed that the number of men and women working full-time, full year, increased by 1.8 million, suggesting a shift from part-year, part-time work status to full-time, year round work.

The fact of the matter is that mothers work. Working families, spurred by working moms, need child care in order to ensure that they can support their families.

In 1990, Congress passed the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG). The law was historic at the time because it offered modest child care subsidies to low income families to support their effort to work. The theory was that a work support was better than welfare support. In 1996, that concept was re-affirmed when CCDBG was reauthorized as part of welfare reform.

Today, 18 years after Congress last revised CCDBG, we have an advantage of better understanding the neuroscience behind child development and lessons learned from the deaths that have occurred in child care throughout the country.  Any child’s death is tragic, but it is even more tragic when it can be prevented.  And that’s the thrust behind the bicameral, bipartisan CCDBG bill. We can better protect children in child care, we can better promote their healthy development, and we can expect more accountability from states that accept federal child care funds.

The House of Representatives passed the CCDBG reauthorization bill on Monday, September 15. The Senate spent the remainder of last week attempting to get agreement to pass the measure. Despite the fact that the Senate approved similar legislation in March by a vote of 96-2, the body was not able to pass it by unanimous consent (UC) before adjourning Thursday evening, September 18.  Unanimous consent was necessary because there was not time before adjourning for lengthy floor debate. Therefore, there were about 30 bills that were approved by UC Thursday night, but not the child care bill.

Two Senators objected to passing the child care bill: Senator Coburn (R-OK) and Senator Toomey (R-PA). The CCDBG bill will be the pending business of the Senate on November 12 when the Senate reconvenes after the election. Hopefully, the measure will pass and be sent to the President for his signature into law.  While that is certainly good news, the delay is not without consequence.  On the surface, it may seem that a delay of 8 weeks is nothing after 18 years. That is true. However, at the same time, the delay pushes the bill into the next fiscal year which begins October 1.  For practical purposes, that means that states will have 3 years (instead of 2) to pass conforming measures to ensure that children are safe and that state policies are accountable as federal funds are spent.

The CCDBG bill is a bipartisan measure that will help support both the needs of working families and the needs of children.  Let’s hope that the Senate will pass this measure without delay in November.

For a summary of the bill, click here.
For a detailed comparison of current law with the provisions in the House passed bill (and pending Senate bill), click here.

Congress Reaches Bipartisan Agreement on Child Care!

On September 12, 2014, a bipartisan group of House and Senate leaders announced an agreement on legislation to reauthorize the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG), which allocates funds to states for child care – to help families afford the cost of child care and assist states in improving the quality of child care. Pre school

While Congress generally reviews laws periodically to adjust them for new research, best practices, and to address any shortcomings not foreseen when bills are drafted (a process referred to as reauthorization,  which generally occurs every 5 years on average), it has been 18 years since CCDBG was last reauthorized in 1996. Much has been learned during the intervening years from the science of brain development to the child care policies within states.  For example, national studies have shown that most state child care policies are weak and the oversight of those policies is even weaker.

Legislation to reauthorize CCDBG was approved by the Senate in March.  The House held a hearing (also in March), to hear from experts about the need for quality child care. This summer, House Republicans and Democrats negotiated a reauthorization bill starting with the measure that was approved by the Senate. With adjournment expected soon this fall, House Education and Workforce Committee members, Chairman John Kline (R-MN), Ranking Member George Miller (D-CA), Rep. Todd Rokita (R-IN) and Rep. David Loebsack (D-IA) reached an agreement and negotiated a final bill with Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee members – Chairman Tom Harkin (D-IA), Ranking Member Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) and Senator Richard Burr (R-NC).

At a time when Congress is polarized, and budget and international events, engagements, and threats are the focus of contentious debate on the House and Senate floor, it is just short of a miracle that a bipartisan, bicameral, group of leaders came together and reached an agreement on an issue that is critical for working families with children.

The fact of the matter is that working families need child care in order to get and retain a job. Children need a safe place to be and a setting that promotes their healthy development. The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) reauthorization bill agreement, as announced yesterday, will both promote children’s safety and improve accountability for the expenditure of federal funds.  It also shows that Congress can come together in a bipartisan manner and in a manner that unites both the House and the Senate on behalf of children.  Kudos Representatives Kline, Miller, Rokita, and Loebsack and Senators Harkin, Alexander, Mikulski, and Burr!  Working families commend your initiative and dedication to push partisan politics aside and support good, common sense policy for children.

The measure is expected to be considered by the House and the Senate during the week of September 15.

Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 2014

In Brief:  The bicameral, bipartisan, CCDBG agreement reached to reauthorize the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) improves the quality of child care by requiring basic health and safety protections for children whose care is paid for by taxpayer dollars.  The funds set-aside for state activities to improve the quality of care will require more accountability for the use of those dollars.  In addition, more emphasis would be placed on strengthening the child care workforce, the cornerstone of quality child care.

For a detailed bill summary, click here. 

For a copy of the bicameral, bipartisan press announcement, click here.

For a copy of the bill, click here.

More Accountability Needed: Child Care Aid by Race

May marks the 60th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark Supreme Court decision that outlawed “separate but equal.”   In the decades since 1954, much as been done to integrate schools, boost performance rates among all children and close the achievement gap that is first noticed in kindergarten. As a nation, we’ve come a long way, but we have a long way to go.

The 2013 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) test scores of our nation’s 4th graders show that:

  • 21 percent of white 4th graders read below grade level;
  • 47 percent of Hispanic 4th graders read below grade level; and
  • 50 percent of African American 4th graders read below grade level.

Studies have well documented the school readiness gap when children enter kindergarten. African American and Hispanic children enter kindergarten below their white peers in reading and math related school readiness skills.

If we are serious about closing the achievement gap, we need to look at where children are before they enter school and strengthen the quality of early childhood settings. Most states now operate Pre-K programs. As studies show, Pre-K can make a difference.  But, Pre-K is not a panacea. The reality is, that most children are in some form of child care every week.  Given the hours that children spend in child care, and the age at which they begin child care settings, it is time to strengthen the quality of child care (for children age 4 and younger) to ensure that children start school ready to succeed and to close the achievement gap.

The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the primary source of federal child care funding to states. More than 1.5 million children each year receive assistance through CCDBG. The split between white and African American children among CCDBG children assisted is about equal (43% of the children whose care is paid for with CCDBG dollars are white; 42% of the children are African American).

What we know from the most recent (FY2012) CCDBG data is: overall, about 256,241 children or 17 percent of the children whose care is paid for by CCDBG are in unlicensed care. While licensing requirements vary by state, little is known about the safety and quality of unlicensed settings – even if federal CCDBG subsidies are used to pay for it.  For example, there may be no training requirements for child care providers or only minimal training required – far below state licensing standards. There may be no health and safety requirements or only minimal requirements – far below state licensing standards. There may be no inspections or unlicensed settings may “self-certify” that they meet any state requirements (if they apply). Background checks for unlicensed child care providers receiving subsidies are mostly based on a name check, not a fingerprint check matched against state and federal records to prohibit those who might attempt to use an alias or circumvent a background screening system.

Unlicensed care does not mean illegal care. Some child care settings are license-exempt, which means that a state statute specifically exempts that category of care from licensing requirements. (For example, a state may specifically exempt “drop in” care, a child care setting in a mall designed to care for a child for a few hours on an irregular basis while a parent shops).  Some states do not license family child care homes until they reach a certain threshold of children. (For example, in 27 states, family child care homes are not required to have a license until they care for 4 or more unrelated children).

Why the attention to unlicensed care?   In 10 states, 30 percent or more of the children whose care is paid for with CCDBG funding are in unlicensed settings. (Alabama, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, and Oregon). For a table of CCDBG funded unlicensed care in all states, click here.  It may be that these settings are safe and offering quality care, but the reality is, we do not know.  What we do know is that minimum protections for children required by licensed care are not required.

In 18 states, 50 percent or more of the children whose care is paid for with CCDBG subsidies are African American.

Race Table Picture

The percentage of children under age 13 within each state in unlicensed care varies greatly. In Arkansas, the District of Columbia, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin, either no CCDBG dollars are spent on unlicensed care or 1 percent or fewer of the children whose care is paid for by CCDBG are in unlicensed care. Among the remaining states, the percentage of children in unlicensed care paid for by CCDBG varies from 72 percent in Hawaii to 2 percent in Georgia.

African American Children Under Age 5 in Unlicensed Care Paid for by CCDBG: What we know from the data is that for children under age 5, African American children are twice as likely to be in unlicensed care than white children (21.4 percent vs 11.8 percent).

Children Under Age 5 by Race

We know that the 4th grade reading test scores show that African American children are more than twice as likely compared to white children to read below grade level. We know that the school readiness gap is first noticed in kindergarten but does not begin in kindergarten. It’s time to bring more accountability to CCDBG funding to ensure that all children are in settings to promote their safety and healthy development.

There is much attention today to expanding Pre-K programs for 4 year-old children. That’s a great goal. However, the fact remains that for many children, child care is their early learning program.  From the research, we know that low income children are more likely to start school behind their more economically well-off peers. From a policy perspective, we know we have an opportunity with CCDBG dollars to ensure that low income children are in higher quality settings than they otherwise would be able to access. However, from the data, we know that nearly one-fifth of those who receive assistance are in unlicensed settings – settings that we know little about except that they are not required to have minimum protections for children.  And, from that same data, we know that African American children under age 5 whose care is paid for with a subsidy are twice as likely as white children to be in unlicensed care.

Sixty years after Brown vs Board of Education, we still have a long way to go. As we seek to close the achievement gap for students in K-12 schools, it is time to review the settings children are in before they start school. Our first step ought to be to review the settings children are in that are funded by taxpayer dollars. Licensed or unlicensed, are federal CCDBG dollars spent in an accountable manner? Are children, whose care is paid for with taxpayer dollars, in settings that are safe and that promote their healthy development?

It is troubling that given the plethora of research that underscores the importance and impact of quality child care on the school readiness of children, and particularly those at risk,  that  African American children under age five are twice as likely as white children to be in unlicensed settings.  If we truly care about school readiness, we can and should create more accountability for how our federal dollars are spent — for all children.

 

Child Care Quality Hearing Held by U.S. House of Representatives

On March 25, the U.S. House Education and the Workforce Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education held a hearing on child care quality. “The Foundation for Success: Strengthening the Child Care and Development Block Grant Program,” was a chance for the Committee with jurisdiction over our nation’s largest source of child care funding to review current policies and practice.

The expert panel at the hearing testifying and responding to questions from Members of Congress:

  • Paula Koos, Executive Director, Oklahoma Child Care Resource & Referral Association

    House Child Care Hearing March 25, 2014

    House Child Care Hearing March 25, 2014

  • Linda Kostantenaco, President, National Child Care Association
  • Dr. Olivia Golden, Executive Director, Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP)
  • Gloria Jarmon, Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services, Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Overall, the hearing focused on the affordability, availability, and quality of child care and the services funded under the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG), the law that allocates funds to the states for child care. CCDBG serves about 1.5 million low-income children throughout the country and invests about $1 billion in activities related to the quality of child care (i.e., activities related to strengthening the workforce and the quality of child care programs, including basic health and safety protections for children).

The reality today is that most parents work. And, in order for families who have young children to work, they need to obtain child care. Finding and affording child care is not easy for parents and most find it a stressful process. The hearing highlighted the role of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies within the states to both help parents find quality child care and help child care providers offer quality child care.

Paula Koos, Executive Director of the Oklahoma Child Care Resource & Referral Association told policymakers about the unique role of child care resource and referral. She talked about the importance of consumer education so that parents can make informed choices when selecting child care. “ In too many communities today, child care is hard for parents to find, hard to afford, and too often of questionable quality. For low income parents, the task is even more difficult. There are more than 600 Child Care Resource and Referral agencies throughout the country, serving nearly every zip code, assisting parents in finding child care. They help make a stressful and chaotic process calmer and more understandable and help parents make better informed choices in child care. The reality is that there is a large gap between parent expectations and state policy.”

Ms. Koos told policymakers about the gap between parent expectations and child care policies within states. “Parents think that a child care license is some type of gold standard, in short, the state’s seal of approval in order to offer child care. Parents assume a license means that adults providing child care have had a background check and training specific to child care. Parents believe there are required health and safety protections for their children, and some expert does inspections to ensure compliance with laws and policies for child care. Parents also assume that all child care settings are monitored when, in many states, large numbers of providers are legally exempt from oversight.”

Paula Koos, ED Oklahoma Child Care Resource & Referral Association

Paula Koos, ED Oklahoma Child Care Resource & Referral Association

“Child Care Resource and Referral has worked with parents in Oklahoma for more than 30 years. We have eight agencies that serve families in all 77 counties to offer consumer education and referrals to help families make better informed child care choices. We do not make recommendations about child care programs to any family. However, we provide them with information so that they can make an informed decision that meets the needs of their family. Finding child care is a stressful time for parents and our services help to alleviate that stress.

Ms. Koos also told policymakers about the role that CCR&R plays with regard to strengthening the workforce – a key element to improving the quality of child care. “We offer training, technical assistance and consultation to providers. Training is provided in both child-related and business requirements. From guiding people who are thinking about launching a child care business, to assisting providers to offer the best quality of care for children, we offer many services.”

“Training is related to strengthening the quality of the workforce – the competence and skills of the workforce. Technical assistance has many forms, but one of the most important is to ensure that those who have taken a training can translate that training to effective practice. What we know from the research is that child to staff interaction is one of the most important factors in improving child outcomes. Just because someone has attended a training, does not necessarily mean that they can effectively implement what they have learned,” said Koos.

“Our agencies offer technical assistance or, TA, on the phone and on-site,” said Koos. One area of TA that she particularly urged the committee to consider is business related technical assistance. “There has been so much focus on child development, which we can all agree is extremely important, we often fail to recognize that almost all child care programs are a small business. In 2012, we commissioned a study, “The Economic Role of Oklahoma’s Child Care Industry,” which found that the state’s 4,100 child care programs represented a network of small businesses, many of which are women owned and operated, that generate nearly $500 million in revenue and provide employment for about 20,500 workers with earnings of $290 million annually,” said Koos.

“Child care is a business. Business related technical assistance can assist child care providers with operating more efficiently and effectively. When you think about quality programs, please think as well, about the ability of child care programs not just to offer trained and competent staff, but also to use sound fiscal and management practices, which are the foundation to quality programs and essential to their sustainability,” said Koos.

Ms. Koos told policymakers that Oklahoma does not have a perfect system, but rather, a system with a stake in the ground for safety, accountability, and quality. “It’s been 17 years without reauthorization of CCDBG. We have the research on state policies. We know from the research what can be translated to best practice for child care safety and child development. I believe it’s time to provide some minimum protections for all our children and to ensure that public dollars are spent in an accountable way,” said Koos. She urged the Committee to take action to:

  • Improve safety protections for children. Require comprehensive background checks for child care providers and volunteers who care for unrelated children. Set minimum health and safety protections for all providers who care for CCDBG subsidized children.
  • Strengthen the Child Care Workforce. Require those who work in child care to have at least 30 hours of pre-service training and 24 hours of annual training. These are the recommendations from pediatric experts (see the National Resource Center for Health and Safety, Caring for Our Children recommendations).
  • Enhance Monitoring. Establish that programs accepting children whose care is paid for by CCDBG should have an inspection prior to licensure and at least once annually.
  • Improve Quality. Increase the quality set-aside for activities related to improving the quality of child care.
  • Subsidy Rates. Child care is expensive. It is hard for most families to afford; it is not merely a challenge for families in poverty. Consider a study by the National Academy of Sciences to review the cost of child care and recommend ways to design a better system.

Ms. Koos told policymakers, “I understand and support the need for state flexibility; however, at the same time, there needs to be some minimum core health and safety protections for all children in child care in our nation.”

Paula Koos with Subcommittee Chairman Rokita

Paula Koos with Subcommittee Chairman Rokita

To view the video of the hearing or the complete testimony of the witnesses, click here.
To view materials Paula submitted for the Committee record, click below:

On March 13, the Senate approved a CCDBG reauthorization bill requiring background checks for child care providers, important improvements to promote the health and safety of children in child care, as well as more accountable monitoring practices. The House is expected to draft similar legislation in the coming months. The House Education and the Workforce full Committee Chairman, Representative Kline, was in attendance at the hearing and spoke positively about the need to improve the quality of child care. This could be the year that Congress passes CCDBG legislation! Stay tuned!

Child Care and Early Learning: 2013 Highlights

The Year in Review

From Congress to the states, 2013 was a banner year for child care and early learning.  Despite a roller coaster ride with the federal budget, early learning initiatives remained a high priority.  As you can see below, much progress has been made to pave the way for continued success in 2014.

Federal PolicyCartoon Capitol

Bipartisan Child Care Reauthorization legislation Approved by Senate Committee:  

In June, bipartisan legislation,  S. 1086, the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 2013, was introduced in the Senate by Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-MD), Senator Richard Burr (R-NC), Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA), and Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN).  The measure was referred to the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee and was approved in September. For a summary of the legislation as approved by the committee, click here.   CCDBG has not been reauthorized in 17 years.  At a time when Congress is polarized on so many issues, it was great to see a bipartisan effort to strengthen the quality of child care.  Hopefully, the full Senate (and the House) will approve the legislation in 2014.

HHS Proposed Revisions to Child Care Regulations to Strengthen the Quality of Care

In May, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) proposed revised child care regulations for the first time since 1998.  Public comments were accepted on the proposed rules through August.  The intent of the rules is to strengthen the health and safety of children in child care and to promote their healthy development.  For a comparison of the bipartisan Senate bill and the proposed HHS rules, click here.  To see public comments about the rules (and to sort by topic), click here.  The final HHS rules are expected to be published in 2014.

Strong Proposals Made for Preschool for All Children

In his 2013 State of the Union Address, President Obama called for Preschool for All Children. As part of his budget proposed to Congress last spring, the President proposed a 10 year $75 billion plan to expand pre-k for all children. The proposal called for quality benchmarks: state level standards for early learning, qualified teachers in every classroom, and comprehensive data and assessment systems. All 4 year-old children from families at 200% of poverty or below would be eligible.  The President’s plan also called for $1.4 billion in new Early Head Start-Child Care partnerships and an expansion of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV).

In November, the Strong Start for America’s Children Act was introduced in the Senate by Senator Harkin (S. 1697) and in the House by Representative Miller (H.R. 3461).  The measures embody the concepts of the President’s plan.  Preschool grants would go to local education agencies (LEAs), including charter schools, early education programs or a consortium of school districts and early education programs.  After full enrollment of 4 year-old children, states would be allowed to enroll 3 year-olds.  States would be required to set-aside 20 percent of funding in the first 4 years for quality related activities and may set-aside 15 percent for high quality infant and toddler programs. The measure also includes non-renewable 3 year preschool development grants.  Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships would be authorized at $1.4 billion.  Some child care provisions were included in the measure to support child care training, licensure, compensation initiatives and health & safety for which $100 million was authorized.  To date, the measure has garnered 23 cosponsors in the Senate and 64 cosponsors in the House.

2013 Race to the Top Early Learning Challenge Grants:  In December, six states received RTT-ELC grants totaling $280 million – Georgia, Kentucky, Michigan, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Vermont. Information about the 2013 grants is located here.

RTT-ELC Grants in Progress: 2011 Award Winners – California, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island, and Washington. Information on 2011 grants is located here.   2012 Award Winners – Colorado, Illinois, New Mexico, Oregon, and Wisconsin. Information on 2012 grants is located here.

2013 Federal Budget in ReviewCapitol Scrabble

What a roller coaster ride this year’s federal budget activity was.

January 2013: The original sequester (the across the board cut that was included in a 2011 budget deal, which Congress delayed until January 2013 as a hammer in the event deficit reduction targets were not met) was pushed to March 1.  The sequester was supposed to be implemented on January 2 and represent a 50/50 reduction between defense and non-defense spending to the tune of $109 billion.  Appropriation bills were not completed in 2012 and a continuing resolution was enacted to freeze spending through March 27.

March 2013:  Despite additional time before the postponed sequester was scheduled to occur, Congress did not reach agreement on deficit reduction. As a result, a sequester of about $80 billion (7.3% in defense spending and 5.1% in non-defense) occurred on March 1.   The House passed its budget resolution (H.Con.Res. 25).  The Senate passed its budget resolution (S.Con.Res. 8).  These measures do not become law.  Instead, they act as a management tool for Congress – a blueprint for spending, revenues, and deficit reduction.  The measures could not be more different, which led to a fiscal impasse for the next 7 months.

FY2014 Senate vs House Budget Resolutions

FY2014 Senate vs House Budget Resolutions

September 2013:  Fiscal year 2013 ended September 30 without Congress passing appropriation bills for the new fiscal year beginning October 1.

October 2013:  With Congress unable to reach a budget agreement, the government shut down for 16 days.  Finally, a deal was reached which extended current spending through January 15, 2014 and charged a Committee with making recommendations by December 13 to deal with the looming sequester.

December 2013:  Senate Budget Chair Patty Murray (D-WA) and House Budget Chair Paul Ryan (R-WI) led a committee announcing a new budget deal in December.  The agreement replaced $63 billion of the sequestration cuts for 2014 and 2015 with other savings measures.  Wait a minute, you must be thinking.  The sequester again? We already had it in March. There’s another sequester? Yes.  The 2011 Budget Control Act set caps on funding through 2021 and called for $1.2 trillion in deficit reduction. Each year through 2021, there will be a $109 billion sequester (equally divided between defense and non-defense spending) to achieve the budget savings called for under the 2011 budget deal.  The Murray-Ryan budget deal will reduce the sequester in January 2014 by $45 billion and by $18 billion in January 2015. While this is good news (relatively), it still means that there will be a reduction in spending of about $64 billion in January 2014 (split equally between defense and nondefense spending).  So, where are we now on the budget?  The good news is that the size of the sequester will be smaller.  It is now up to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees to determine funding levels for various programs with a little more funding to work with absent the Murray-Ryan agreement.  With the current CR scheduled to expire on January 15, we can expect early January funding decisions to be made.  Stay tuned.

2013 State Child Care & Pre-K Achievementspreschool report 2013

Child Care Provider Background Checks.  Children should be safe in child care and people with a violent history should not be in the business of caring for unrelated children.  2013 was a banner year for states passing child care provider background check legislation.  Massachusetts led the way by passing fingerprint check legislation in January 2013 (effective September 1, 2013).  In March, Utah passed legislation (effective July 2013) and Georgia passed legislation (effective January 2014).  Indiana passed legislation (effective July 2013) requiring all regulated child care providers to have a fingerprint check against FBI databases.  Oklahoma passed legislation in 2011, which became effective in November 2013. Kentucky revised regulations in the fall to require an address search of the sex offender registry for all registered providers.  Virginia pre-filed child care background check bills in the Senate and House to be considered in January 2014.

Child Care Provider Health & Safety.  States continued to pass legislation improving health and safety requirements.  Arkansas, Indiana, Minnesota, Texas, and Utah passed legislation.  Kentucky revised regulations to strengthen health and safety policies.

State Pre-K Programs.  Hawaii and Mississippi passed legislation establishing statewide voluntary preschool.  In December, the Mississippi State Board of Education awarded $2 million to 11 consortiums to provide pre-k for 4 year-olds.  All of the consortiums include at least one school district, as well as other groups such as Head Start, private child care centers, and foundations.  Texas doubled the size of its pre-k program in Dallas.

Early Learning Improvements.  Colorado created the Infant and Toddler Quality and Availability Grant program, which was funded at $3 million beginning in July 2013.  Minnesota established an Early Learning Scholarship program for families with children who will be age 3 or 4 by September 1 with income at or below 185% of the poverty line.  Scholarships are capped at $5,000 per year.   Rhode Island established a Child Care Assistance Program Parent Advisory Council to advise the Governor and state agencies on issues related to the quality, affordability, and accessibility of child care offered through the state subsidy program.  Washington established an Early Start Program – a continuum of early learning programs from birth to age five, which includes:  home visiting and parent education programs; the early achievers program (the state’s QRIS); integrated full day and part day, high quality early learning programs; and high quality preschool for children in families at or below 110% of the federal poverty line.

State QRIS.  Nebraska passed legislation directing the State Department of Education and the Department of Health and Human Services to collaborate to develop and implement a quality rating system, establish quality rating criteria, assign a quality scale, and provide incentives and support, including professional development to participating child care providers.  Washington will require preschool programs receiving state funds to enroll in the state’s QRIS and maintain a minimum score level.

Key 2013 Reports:

2013 Interesting Policy Databases

2013 Census Bureau Quick Tools

Interactive Map:  In December, the Census Bureau released Census Explorer, a new interactive map that gives users easier access to neighborhood-level statistics. The map uses updated statistics from the 2008-2012 American Community Survey (ACS).

Interested in finding Census Bureau data about your community? Watch this fact finder webinar hosted by Census Bureau Experts.

My Congressional District gives users quick and easy access to selected statistics collected by the Census Bureau through the American Community Survey. The American Community Survey provides updated detailed demographic, social and economic statistics every year.

Coming in January 2014 from the Census Bureau:

Dynamics of Economic Well-Being: Poverty 2009-2011 — Analytical report on the duration of poverty spells and the frequency of transitions into and out of poverty based on the Survey of Income and Program Participation. It focuses on episodic and chronic poverty, length of poverty, exits from poverty and the characteristics of the affected population. (Scheduled for release Jan. 7.)

Measuring Alternative Educational Credentials — The Census Bureau’s first-ever report on the number and characteristics of adults with educational credentials other than academic degrees, such as a professional certification or license, or educational certificate. The data, based on the Survey of Income and Program Participation, pertain to fall 2012. (Scheduled for release Jan. 16.)

2014 Road Forward

Together We Can Move Mountains!

Together We Can Move Mountains!

The good news for 2013 was that progress on the early learning front was made and important markers were set. Thank you to state child care administrators, parents, advocates, child care providers, child care experts and everyone who works every day to improve the quality of early learning settings.

We’re on the road, we need to continue building on the successes we’ve had.  Together, we can make a difference to ensure that all children have access to safe, quality, affordable child care and early learning settings.